Call for Papers – Upcoming Special Issues of ‘Contemporary Social Science’

1. Social Inequality and Its Consequences in the 21st Century

 Guest editor: Jennifer Jarman, Lakehead University

[email protected]

Papers are invited dealing with ‘Social Inequality and Its Consequences in 21st Century Societies’. Papers that give attention to newer aspects of social inequality as well as papers about older aspects of social inequality still significant in contemporary societies are especially welcome.

The bases for social inequality could include but is not limited to: age, citizenship status, gender, ethnicity, health status, religion, social class, and sexuality. These could be treated separately or in combination with one another. Papers with themes and approaches that cross disciplinary divides are particularly relevant, as the main audience for the journal is a community of scholars and professional practitioners seeking interdisciplinary perspectives on issues of social relevance.

Papers are therefore invited that address, from any social sciences perspective, the relevance and impact of the any or all forms of social inequality. These could include, inter alia, for example: conceptualizing inequalities, measuring inequality, direct and indirect costs of social inequality, major cultural or geographic differences in how social inequalities are viewed, the long-term consequences of inequality, and recent changes in inequalities.

Soundly empirically based studies are preferred, although high quality scholarly essays will also be considered.

Manuscripts should follow the guidelines and usual format for submission of papers to Contemporary Social Science as indicated in Instructions for Authors at: https://tinyurl.com/pud5vem

Papers should be submitted online at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rsoc indicating they are for this special issue.

The Guest Editor for this special issue is happy to review plans for papers in advance of their receipt. All papers will be peer reviewed. The closing date for submitting papers is April 13th, 2015.

The corresponding Guest Editor for this issue is Jennifer Jarman, Lakehead University [email protected]

 

2. International and Interdisciplinary Insights into Evidence-based Policy

Building on earlier publications of Contemporary Social Science examining knowledge transfer, this Special Issue calls for papers that address the questions raised about the relationship between evidence and policy by adopting an international perspective and, where appropriate, a multidisciplinary approach to the policy process. The papers will explore both the institutions acting as evidence brokers and the different methods used to collect and assess evidence in a variety of international contexts. Of particular relevance are papers that highlight the strengths and weaknesses, or successes and failures, of different institutional and methodological approaches to evidence-based policy, and consider what elements of the lessons learned might be transferable across national and cultural boundaries.

The Guest Editors are seeking original articles, critical reviews and case studies that use a range of methods to explore academic and scholarly issues. Sound empirically based studies on the relationship between evidence and policy will be welcomed, as will high quality scholarly essays. Topics of particular interest due to current policy attention include early intervention, poverty prevention, access to educational opportunities and skills, changing family structures, intergenerational solidarity, ageing and healthy living.

How to submit

The papers will be 5–8,000 words in length. Manuscripts should follow the usual instructions for electronic submission of papers to Contemporary Social Science. Authors should indicate that they wish the manuscript to be reviewed for inclusion in the Special Issue. The Editors of this Issue would be happy to review plans for papers in advance of their receipt. All papers will be peer reviewed. The closing date for submitting papers is 1 June 2015.

Outline proposals (150–200 words) should be forwarded to the Guest Editors by 15 December 2014:

 

3. High-Speed Rail – Fast track to where?

The proposal to construct a high-speed rail link, HS2, from London to Birmingham by 2026, and, ultimately, to the North of England during the 2030s, is one of the biggest and most controversial UK infrastructure projects for a generation.  It is one of a number of proposals to replicate the model of European inter-city rail transport that have been put forward in the US, Australia and other countries. These proposals have all stimulated vigorous public and policy debates. However, much of the evidence presented in these debates has come from consultancy reports that are often alleged to be partisan in their approaches and conclusions. This special issue creates an interdisciplinary forum for the social sciences to contribute their analyses of such projects.

This special issue is expected to cover questions like:

  • Do high-speed rail projects really promote regional growth or do they draw more economic activity to the capital?
  • How satisfactory is economic modelling as a basis for very long-term and large-scale investment decisions?
  • What impact does high-speed rail have on other transport modes?
  • Can the management risks of large-scale infrastructure projects really be controlled?
  • How does high-speed rail fit the mobility challenges of 2030?
  • How can policy communities take sustainable decisions on large, long-term infrastructure projects?
  • What contributes to or obstructs public acceptance of the impacts of high-speed rail construction on lifestyles, landscapes or cities?
  • Who are the winners and losers from high-speed rail?
  • How have publics and media responded to the many different discourses used to both promote and undermine high-speed rail?
  • Does high-speed rail represent a sustainable turn in transport planning or is it just business as usual?

How to submit

Submissions are invited from any social science with expertise to offer on the global experience with high-speed rail, or with comparative studies of other large infrastructure projects. We anticipate that this will include economics, sociology, politics, geography and management studies but contributions from other fields would be particularly welcomed.  For preference, papers should draw on empirical evidence, although they may take the form of reviews intended to summarize and evaluate a body of work, and to identify future directions.

Manuscripts should be 5-8,000 words in length and follow the usual instructions for electronic submission of papers to Contemporary Social Science. Authors should indicate that they wish the manuscript to be reviewed for inclusion in the special issue. The Editors of this issue would be happy to give advice on outline plans for possible papers in advance of their submission receipt. All papers will be peer reviewed. The closing date for submitting papers is 5th January 2015. 

Editorial information

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